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SenditCertified for Microsoft Outlook: Read Our Exclusive Report

By Neil J. Squillante | Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Originally published in our free TL NewsWire newsletter. Instead of reading TL NewsWire here, sign up now to receive future issues via email.

EMAIL ENCRYPTION THAT DOESN'T REQUIRE A CRYPTOGRAPHY DEGREE

Would you use regular email if you want to communicate with Edward Snowden? Unlikely. You wouldn't only have to worry about our spy agencies, but also Russia's so you'd need to use encrypted email. However, because encrypted email requires you to jump through so many hoops, you'd probably decide against emailing Snowden your Chicken Kiev recipe. But what about your clients? You need to email them. They don't want you calling. Encrypted email that works like regular email would solve this conundrum.

SenditCertified for Microsoft Outlook … in One Sentence

Launched recently, Privacy Data Systems' SenditCertified for Microsoft Outlook enables you to send secure email messages and attachments from Microsoft Outlook.

The Killer Feature

SenditCertified for Microsoft Outlook is an add-on that requires just one behavioral modification — clicking the "SendItCertified" button that the software adds to Outlook instead of the default Send button.

SenditCertified for Microsoft Outlook encrypts both your email message and any attachments. Outlook's Sent Items folder keeps a record of every message you send. Through your web account, you can access the Proof of Delivery Log that provides a complete chain-of-custody, including all actions taken by each recipient.

"With SenditCertified for Microsoft Outlook, sending secure email is easier than ever," Privacy Data Systems President and CEO Jeff Holt told us. "Simply type a message in Outlook and then send it securely with just a click. SenditCertified for Microsoft Outlook provides unprecedented convenience without sacrificing security."

Other Notable Features

SenditCertified for Microsoft Outlook solves another problem. You can send attachments of any size. It bypasses not only any attachment size limitations of the email systems your recipients use, but also those imposed by Outlook. That's because recipients download your attachment from SenditCertified's secure AES 256-bit servers — the strongest encryption available for commercial use. Thanks to end-to-end encryption, your messages remain secure in transit and at rest.

If you need to securely send a document from a device not running Outlook such as a Mac, iPad, or iPhone, you can obtain the same functionality using the SenditCertified website once you login with your credentials.

Recipients don't need any software to receive your messages and attachments — not even Outlook. However, for added security, you can require them to enter a password or fingerprint verification depending on the sensitivity of your communication. If recipients need to securely send you messages and documents, they can use the SecureInbox included with your subscription at no charge to them.

What Else Should You Know?

Other features include message recall, secure audio and video messages, and electronic signatures. SenditCertified offers several monthly and annual subscription plans depending on your needs. Learn more about SenditCertified for Microsoft Outlook.

How to Receive TL NewsWire
So many products, so little time. In each issue of TL NewsWire, you'll learn about five new products for the legal profession. Pressed for time? The newsletter's innovative articles enable lawyers and law office administrators to quickly understand the function of a product, and zero in on its most important features. The TL NewsWire newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Collaboration/Knowledge Management | Coming Attractions | Email/Messaging/Telephony | Privacy/Security | TL NewsWire

Legal Hub: Read Our Exclusive Report

By Neil J. Squillante | Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Originally published in our free TL NewsWire newsletter. Instead of reading TL NewsWire here, sign up now to receive future issues via email.

SHARING IS THE POINT OF DOCUMENT AND PRACTICE MANAGEMENT

Traditional practice management systems limit access to those who work at your law firm. This results in using email to send documents to clients and others. Email suffers from several problems such as the risk of misaddressing your message, the inability to track receipt and activity by recipients, and limits on attachment size. Instead of using email or implementing a separate solution such as SharePoint, practice management systems should have built-in collaboration tools.

Legal Hub by PBworks … in One Sentence

PBworks' Legal Hub is a document and practice management system and client portal for managing matters and documents, and securely collaborating with clients, co-counsel, and others.

The Killer Feature

Legal Hub has catered to large law firms for years. The new version released this month caters to solos and small law firms as well. Some solos and small law firms may find that they never need to pay for LegalHub. That's because it's free for up to 15 internal users, up to five external users, up to five clients and matters, and up to 50 MB of storage. This free plan also includes email technical support. You need not provide a credit card to get started.

"For years, leading law firms from the AmLaw 100 to solo practitioners have used Legal Hub to manage key client relationships and matters," PBworks CEO Jim Groff told us. "Now any law firm can sign up and try it for free."

Other Notable Features

Legal Hub describes itself as a SharePoint alternative built specifically for law firms. Because Legal Hub is a cloud application, law firms need not contend with SharePoint's complexity and hardware requirements.

You begin by setting up your clients and their respective matters, and then granting access rights to the matters you create. Each Matter has a summary page listing the Matter Number, status, the internal team, key external contacts, etc. From this page, you can drill down to access related documents, email, meetings, notes, and tasks. Legal Hub features a system-wide Google-style search so that you quickly find anything across all clients and matters.

You add documents and email messages to a matter using drag and drop. One-click sharing enables you to give clients and others access to select documents such as a draft agreement, pleadings, discovery documents, etc. You can see when someone accesses what you share and receive a notification via email (you can receive notifications for virtually any activity in Legal Hub).

Within each matter, you can focus on specific projects such as an upcoming closing or deposition. Each matter "workspace" contains relevant documents and email as well as tasks and deadlines. You can assign tasks to others and track their progress using a variety of reports.

Given the sensitivity of client-related information, Legal Hub uses enterprise-level encryption and security. Access rights extend all the way down to specific documents. Audit tracking logs all activity with date and time stamps.

What Else Should You Know?

If your firm exceeds the limits of the free version of Legal Hub, you can upgrade to unlimited clients and matters, as well as 100 GB of storage, for $40 per user per month. PBworks offers volume discounts beginning as 20 users. Learn more about Legal Hub.

How to Receive TL NewsWire
So many products, so little time. In each issue of TL NewsWire, you'll learn about five new products for the legal profession. Pressed for time? The newsletter's innovative articles enable lawyers and law office administrators to quickly understand the function of a product, and zero in on its most important features. The TL NewsWire newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Collaboration/Knowledge Management | Document Management | Online/Cloud | Practice Management/Calendars | TL NewsWire

Synergy Matters: Read Our Exclusive Report

By Neil J. Squillante | Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Originally published in our free TL NewsWire newsletter. Instead of reading TL NewsWire here, sign up now to receive future issues via email.

AUTOMATION MEETS PRACTICE MANAGEMENT

Many law firms have more than enough work but not enough profits to show for it. Two solutions exist. You could raise rates and receive push back from clients. Alternatively, you can use technology to improve automation, enabling your firm to handle more work without raising rates (not to mention headcount).

Synergy Matters … in One Sentence

Launched this week, Legal Matters Software's Synergy Matters is a practice management system with an emphasis on automation thanks to tools for time capture, cost recovery, document management, and faxing.

The Killer Feature

Synergy Matters contains a number of technologies to prevent lost billable time. For example, it automatically tracks the time you spend on a matter (e.g., drafting documents, writing email messages, etc.). This eliminates the need to use timers and other manual time-tracking methods. A review window lists all your captured time by matter with a corresponding description. After editing (if required), you can post these time entries to any accounting system.

Similarly, Synergy Matters, automatically tracks your scans, faxes, and prints. If you charge for costs, Synergy Matters can automatically post these to your accounting system. If you don't, you can use this data to adjust your rates to make sure your disbursements don't eat into your profits.

"Synergy Matters is the result of eight years working with law firms and refining our software to produce the easiest-to-use tool to enhance productivity in a law firm environment", Vice President of Sales John Ryan told us.

Other Notable Features

When you create a new document or email message from within a matter, Synergy Matter automatically saves it there. Thanks to an integration with Outlook, you can save incoming email to a matter with one click.

Synergy Matters works with a number of scanners, enabling you to scan directly to a matter in PDF format. Built-in OCR software makes all scanned PDF documents searchable. You'll also find tools for converting Word documents into PDF format, combining multiple documents into a single PDF document, and Bates stamping PDF documents.

The document management system features collaborative tools and preservation of revisions. You can share a document with anyone by clicking the "For Review" button, which creates a link to the original document. Synergy matters automatically saves changes others make as a new version of the document, thus preserving all previous versions.

What Else Should You Know?

Synergy Matters offers fax server functionality when connected to the optional Synergy Fax Appliance. This enables everyone to send faxes from their PC. Synergy Matters automatically saves a copy of each fax with proof of delivery in the corresponding matter. You can route incoming faxes to individuals, groups, your records department, etc. Synergy Matters can automatically bill for all incoming and outgoing faxes. Learn more about Synergy Matters.

How to Receive TL NewsWire
So many products, so little time. In each issue of TL NewsWire, you'll learn about five new products for the legal profession. Pressed for time? The newsletter's innovative articles enable lawyers and law office administrators to quickly understand the function of a product, and zero in on its most important features. The TL NewsWire newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Accounting/Billing/Time Capture | Collaboration/Knowledge Management | Document Management | Email/Messaging/Telephony | Practice Management/Calendars | TL NewsWire

iPad Email Tips; XpressDox Examples; Reviews of Scrivener, OmniOutliner; A WordPerfect Valentine

By Kathryn Hughes | Friday, February 14, 2014

Today's issue of Fat Friday contains these articles:

Neil Squillante, Thinking Different About Composing Email on Your iPad

Kent Davis, Examples of XpressDox in Action in Law Firms

David Roper, Review: Scrivener and OmniOutliner

Andrew J. Zuckerman, This Article on Word Explains Why I Use WordPerfect

Don't miss this issue — or any future issues.

How to Receive Fat Friday
Our most serendipitous offering, Fat Friday consists of unsolicited contributions by TechnoLawyer members. You'll no doubt enjoy it because of its mix of interesting topics and genuinely useful knowledge, including brutally honest product reviews and informative how-tos. The Fat Friday newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Automation/Document Assembly/Macros | Business Productivity/Word Processing | Collaboration/Knowledge Management | Coming Attractions | Email/Messaging/Telephony | Fat Friday | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets

Review of Workshare Enterprise Plus What's Hot and Not in Large Firms

By Kathryn Hughes | Friday, December 6, 2013

Coming today to BigLaw: Document sharing has always existed in law practice, but it has become increasingly complex. Sending a document back and forth via FedEx was slow and expensive but easy and secure. Nowadays, large law firms need an instantaneous file sharing solution as flexible as Dropbox (desktop, iPad, and web) but with better security and which integrates with their document management system. In this issue of BigLaw, law firm CIO Matthew Berg reviews the file sharing capabilities of Workshare Enterprise. Also, don't miss the BigLaw Pick of the Week for a list of what's hot and what's not according to the leaders of large law firms.

How to Receive BigLaw
Large and midsize law firms have achieved unprecedented success yet they still have tremendous growth potential. Written by insiders, corporate counsel, and other industry experts, BigLaw unearths best practices in leadership, marketing, strategy, and technology, and features detailed product reviews with accompanying TechnoScore ratings. BigLaw also ensures that you won't miss anything published elsewhere by linking to insightful articles (and podcasts and videos) about large and midsize law firms, as well as notable press releases issued by the world's largest law firms. The BigLaw newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: BigLaw | Collaboration/Knowledge Management | Coming Attractions | Document Management | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets

Review of Pages 2.0 (iPad/iPhone Word Processing App) Plus Market Your Law Firm on a Tight Budget

By Jeff Richardson | Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Originally published on November 25, 2013 in our free SmallLaw newsletter. Instead of reading SmallLaw here after the fact, sign up now to receive future issues in realtime.

A new word processing fight has begun, this time on touchscreen devices and in the cloud. In this issue of SmallLaw, litigator and iPad for lawyers expert Jeff Richardson reviews Apple's new Pages 2.0, which runs on iPads and iPhones and is compatible with the new Mac and web versions. Jeff focuses on the features lawyers care about, including formatting, redlining, realtime collaboration, and most importantly document fidelity with Microsoft Word. Also, don't miss the SmallLaw Pick of the Week (newsletter only) for the top 10 ways to market your law firm on a tight budget.

REVIEW OF PAGES 2.0 (IPAD WORD PROCESSING APP)

Microsoft CEO Steve Balmer recently revealed that Microsoft Office for the iPad will ship when the company finishes developing a version of Office that supports a touch interface. He didn't specify a ship date.

In the meantime, Apple's Pages word processor (one third of the iWork suite) has been one of the best iPad word processors compatible with Microsoft Word.

Previously, Pages cost everyone $9.99. However, it's now free when you buy an iOS device (which also makes it free for any older devices you have that use the same Apple ID for the App Store). There are two catches. First, Pages 2.0 has changed significantly. Second, the new version requires iOS 7. In this issue of SmallLaw, I'll evaluate the most notable new features from the perspective of legal practice.

Before we get underway, other alternatives for working with Word files on an iPad exist. I covered these earlier this year. Unlike Pages, they have not changed dramatically in the interim. See Jeff Richardson, Viewing, Editing, and Redlining Word Documents on Your iPad and iPhone, SmallLaw (January 15, 2013).

Overview of Pages 2.0

The new version of Pages works well for typing notes and drafting simple documents (especially if you use a Bluetooth keyboard). It's powerful, very stable (it has never crashed on me), supports viewing and creation of redlines, exports to PDF format, and can both import from and export to Word format. It's also handy that Pages now stores documents online using Apple's iCloud service. This enables you to access your documents from other devices as I explain in more detail below.

Apple didn't just update the iOS version of Pages but also the Mac version. As alluded to above, there's also a web version of Pages. The changes to the Mac version have proven controversial because Apple removed many power features to make Pages' file format and features identical across all three versions.

If, like most SmallLaw subscribers, you use a Windows PC, iPad, and iPhone, the Mac controversy is irrelevant. More importantly, the new iOS version has gained many new features (the opposite of what happened to the Mac version). This parity across versions is not surprising considering that Apple makes much more money selling iPads and iPhones then it does selling Macs.

New Text Formatting Bar

You can now make common formatting changes much more quickly thanks to the new text formatting bar that appears just above the on-screen keyboard (or on the bottom of the screen when using an external keyboard). Selections such as bold, italics, underline, line justification, and indent are now just a tap away. The formatting bar also includes a tab button at the far left, which is useful when using the on-screen keyboard as it lacks a tab button. Also, a plus sign at the far right of the formatting bar makes it easy to add a page, line or column break, or insert a footnote or a comment.

Speaking of comments, Pages finally lets you see, edit, and create comments in an document. In prior versions of Pages, not only did the app not show comments, it actually deleted all comments in the document.

iCloud Document Collaboration

Apple's new iWork for iCloud service makes Pages for iPad more powerful in two important ways.

First, you can now access and edit any of your Pages documents from a web browser on a computer. This is not much of an advantage if you use a Mac because you'll likely prefer using the Mac version of Pages. But if, like me, you use a PC in your office, you can now log into iCloud to use the excellent (and free) web version of Pages, which has almost complete feature parity with the iOS and Mac versions of Pages.

For example, you can start a document on your iPad, continue to work on it using Pages for iCloud on your PC, and then finish it on your iPad. This parity across devices and platforms works well. The Pages app on my iPad is much more useful now that I can easily use a version of Pages on my PC. iWork for iCloud also enables me to make quick edits to Pages documents using my iPhone.

Second, you can now share a Pages document with someone else. Furthermore, both of you can view and edit the document at the same time. Pages includes an option to email a link to your document. The recipient clicks on the link to launch Pages for iCloud on their computer (PC or Mac) and display the document you shared. This works even if the recipient doesn't have an iCloud account or any Apple hardware. Changes that you make on your iPad and changes that the other person makes using Pages for iCloud are synced back and forth — but not instantaneously. In my testing, it take about 20-30 seconds for you to see the other person's changes.

For example, if you are in a room (or on the phone on opposite sides of the planet) negotiating the terms of a contract with opposing counsel, you can share a document created in Pages with opposing counsel, and then go back and forth making changes on the final wording. If you make contradictory edits at the same time, the owner of the document (the person who shares it) will get to decide whose edits to keep; the other party sees an alert that the document owner is resolving a conflict.

Note that if multiple people access a document using Pages for iCloud on multiple computers, they can actually see every edit as it occurs in realtime — the cursor changes color to indicate who is making which changes. This is a useful feature that I hope to one day see in Pages for iPad. Considering that the Apple engineers decided to implement this feature in Pages for iCloud, and considering that Apple is trying to maintain feature parity across all versions of Pages (going so far as to remove features from Pages for Mac), it seems reasonable to suspect that Apple is working on this feature for a future update to Pages.

Document Fidelity With Microsoft Word

Although Pages includes a Change Tracking feature for creating redline edits to a Word document, when you convert a document from Word to Pages format (to edit it on your iPad) and then from Pages to Word (to continue to work with it on a computer), some formatting and other file attributes get lost in the process.

Pages 2.0 does a better job maintaining document fidelity. For example, as noted above, comments are now preserved. But I still see some glitches after a roundtrip. You can use Pages to create redline edits and indicate to another attorney which changes you want to make in a Word document, but I recommend that the other attorney then make those edits by hand to their original Word document and not simply accept all of your edits in a document converted to Word by Pages. Indeed, when I use Pages to suggest redline edits to someone else, I send back a PDF version showing my edits.

Similarly, if you don't want to create redline edits but you instead just want to directly edit a Word document and then send someone else the final document in Word format (or send the document back to your computer in Word format), you cannot always depend upon the formatting remaining exactly the same. It is often close enough not to matter, but not always. For better document fidelity, I recommend that you use Documents to Go for iPad, which unfortunately cannot create redline edits and lacks some other features that Pages has.

Document fidelity is the main reason I look forward to the day when Microsoft releases a version of Word for the iPad. In my tests so far, the Microsoft Office Mobile app for the iPhone does an excellent job preserving document attributes. This bodes well for the forthcoming iPad app. Read my recent review for more details. See Jeff Richardson, Review of Microsoft Office Mobile (Word for iPhone), SmallLaw (July 3, 2013).

TechnoScore

Pages includes many features that I purposefully have not discussed — such as the ability to insert graphics to create a beautiful newsletter or flyer — because despite being cool, most attorneys are unlikely to use them (though your marketing department might). Indeed, my top priority for an iPad word processor is to create and work with Microsoft Word files, so it is from that perspective that I provide a TechnoScore for Pages.

In my opinion, no iPad app currently does a good enough job with Word documents to deserve an A+ or even an A, so I respectfully disagree with Brett Burney who gave Documents to Go and Office2 HD an A+ and Quickoffice Pro HD an A in his review last year. Indeed, Quickoffice does not even show footnotes in a document, making it a non-starter for many lawyers. See Brett Burney, The Best iPad App for Word Processing in Microsoft Formats, SmallLaw (October 9, 2012).

Nevertheless, with the updates in version 2.0, Pages deserves an A–. The app would get an A if it included the document fidelity of Documents to Go (although Pages has many other advantages over Documents to Go such as editable footnotes and comments, and redlining) or of Microsoft Office Mobile for iPhone (which in its current state has only a fraction of the features of Pages).

Overall, Pages 2.0 is as good as it currently gets for viewing and working with Word files on an iPad. I look forward to seeing how it stacks up against the version of Word that Microsoft eventually offers for the iPad — hopefully in 2014.

Pages: A- (4.5/5.0)
www.apple.com/ios/pages/

Jeff Richardson practices law in New Orleans and publishes iPhone J.D., the oldest and largest website for attorneys who use the iPhone and iPad.

How to Receive SmallLaw
Small firm, big dreams. Written by practicing lawyers who manage successful small firms and legal technology and practice management experts who have achieved rock star status, this newsletter provides practical advice on management, marketing, and technology issues in small law firms, as well as comprehensive legal product reviews with accompanying TechnoScore ratings. The SmallLaw newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Business Productivity/Word Processing | Collaboration/Knowledge Management | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets | SmallLaw

Livescribe 3 Smartpen: Read Our Exclusive Report

By Neil J. Squillante | Thursday, November 14, 2013

Today's issue of TL NewsWire covers a Bluetooth ballpoint pen that transmits your notes to your iPad or iPhone (see article below), a doorbell that connects to your smartphone, an online word processor with realtime collaboration, and a portable flatbed scanner. Don't miss the next issue.

A PEN MIGHTIER THAN A STYLUS

Lawyers find themselves in a bit of a quandary nowadays when taking notes. Because of their raised lids and the sound of their keyboards, laptops may distract the person you're interviewing. An iPad paired with a stylus and an app that can record and sync audio seems ideal except that using a stylus slows you down. You may find it hard to keep up. This leaves pen and paper, which is fast but cannot record and sync the recorded audio to your notes. Lawyers need a mashup of all three note-taking methods.

Livescribe 3 Smartpen … in One Sentence

Launched two weeks ago, Livescribe 3 Smartpen is a Bluetooth ballpoint pen that transmits your notes and synced audio to your iPad or iPhone.

The Killer Feature

Livescribe 3 Smartpen requires Livescribe Dot Paper, which you can purchase from the company in various sizes and formats or print from your computer. You'll also need the free companion Livescribe+ app, which requires iOS 7 and works with an iPad 3 or later, original iPad mini or later, and iPhone 4s or later.

The app features handwriting recognition software that converts your handwritten notes into searchable and editable text. This not only obviates having to transcribe your notes, but also enables you to convert notes into appointments, contacts, tasks, and more thanks to the app's integration with Calendar, Contacts, Reminders, Evernote, and other apps. You can also tap a phone number to dial it when viewing notes on your iPhone.

Other Notable Features

Livescribe 3 Smartpen lasts for 14 hours when fully charged (you charge it using the bundled USB cable). In a clever twist, the pen's cover features a nib, enabling you to use it directly on your iPad or iPhone as a stylus.

The Livescribe+ app enables you to add photos and type text onto the notes you take with the Livescribe 3 Smartpen. Notes exist in PDF format, enabling you to send them to anyone, and work on them in any application that supports the PDF format.

In addition to the default Page view, you'll find two other views in the Livescribe+ app. The "Feed" button intelligently segments a page of notes. For example, the app recognizes headings for section segmenting as well as pauses in your note-taking for chronological segmenting. You can export a segment as its own note. The "Pencast" button plays back your note-taking while playing the synced audio. A scrubber enables you to play a specific portion.

What Else Should You Know?

You can choose from two packages. For $149.95, you get one ink cartridge and a 50 sheet starter notebook with the Livescribe 3 Smartpen. For $199.95, you get two ink cartridges, a leather Livescribe portfolio, a 100 sheet pad that fits in the portfolio, and a one-year Evernote Premium subscription that would normally cost $45. Learn more about Livescribe 3 Smartpen.

How to Receive TL NewsWire
So many products, so little time. In each issue of TL NewsWire, you'll learn about five new products for the legal profession. Pressed for time? The newsletter's innovative articles enable lawyers and law office administrators to quickly understand the function of a product, and zero in on its most important features. The TL NewsWire newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Collaboration/Knowledge Management | Gadgets/Shredders/Office Gear | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets | TL NewsWire

LexisNexis Time Matters 13: Read Our Exclusive Report

By Neil J. Squillante | Thursday, October 10, 2013

Today's issue of TL NewsWire covers practice management software with a secure client portal (see article below), a height-adjustable desk, a project management application, and an iPad app for creating timelines. Don't miss the next issue.

PRACTICE MANAGEMENT WITH A SECURE CLIENT PORTAL

A recent study published by Ponemon Institute found that data breaches have occurred at approximately 90% of organizations. You've no doubt read articles about such security breaches. However, it's the security breaches you never find out about that wreak the most harm. Not every criminal gets caught after all. Maybe you didn't lose that trial last year on the merits. A new practice management system contains a technology to prevent such breaches.

LexisNexis Time Matters 13 … in One Sentence

Announced this week and launching later this month, LexisNexis Time Matters 13 is a practice management and billing system with a new secure client portal.

The Killer Feature

Today's clients want the convenience of online client portals for access to their matters, including confidential and privileged documents. However, you're responsible for providing a secure solution. Your bar can only protect you from ethics charges, not other harm that results from data breaches.

LexisNexis claims that the new Time Matters Client Portal enables your firm to provide your clients and other third parties with secure yet convenient access to designated documents. As an added bonus, you need not worry about file size unlike with email. The Time Matters Client Portal is powered by WatchDox, which industry research firms Forrester and Gartner have both endorsed as the most secure enterprise file sharing solution.

The Time Matters Client Portal requires minimal setup and training. Among its features, you can share files with both PCs and mobile devices, restrict the documents you share (e.g., prevent copying, editing, printing, and/or forwarding), add a watermark unique to each user to discourage breaches, set an expiration date, revoke previously granted access temporarily or permanently, and prevent unauthorized screen capture by limiting access to small areas of a document at any one time (PC-only currently). Needless to say, all documents are encrypted. You can wipe access to any or all of your firm's documents any time.

"The dramatic proliferation of mobile devices has raised client expectations for secure access to documents," Time Matter Product Manager Alex Overcash told us. "However, law firms are justifiably concerned about security given their stewardship of sensitive information. There simply hasn't been a viable alternative until now. The Time Matters Client Portal offers a simple but highly effective way to know who has access to a file, what they can do with it, and for how long."

Other Notable Features

As its version number 13 suggests, Time Matters has a wealth of features that not only encompass traditional practice management, but also modern features such as Time Entry Advisor, which debuted last year in version 12. You can use Time Matters out of the box or customize it with the help of a certified consultant and/or third-party add-ons.

New features include the ability to color code matters in calendars so that everyone can instantly identify Events and ToDos related to particular matters. Like Time Entry Advisor, color coding also helps you catch billable hours that might otherwise go unbilled. Version 13 also includes administrator-configurable automatic backups to help prevent catastrophic data loss.

What Else Should You Know?

Existing Time Matters customers with an annual maintenance plan (AMP) can upgrade to version 13 at no charge. Otherwise, Time Matters costs $985 for the first user and $570 for each additional user. These prices include a one-year AMP, which provides you with 12 hours of telephone support on weekdays, software updates, on-demand online training, and Time Matters Mobility for access from your smartphone. Learn more about LexisNexis Time Matters 13.

How to Receive TL NewsWire
So many products, so little time. In each issue of TL NewsWire, you'll learn about five new products for the legal profession. Pressed for time? The newsletter's innovative articles enable lawyers and law office administrators to quickly understand the function of a product, and zero in on its most important features. The TL NewsWire newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Accounting/Billing/Time Capture | Collaboration/Knowledge Management | Practice Management/Calendars | Privacy/Security | TL NewsWire

iPhone and iPad Information Management Tips Plus the Best iPad Keyboards

By Jeff Richardson | Thursday, October 3, 2013

Originally published on August 30 in our free SmallLaw newsletter. Instead of reading SmallLaw here after the fact, sign up now to receive future issues in realtime.

You've heard stories about hapless iPhone owners who thought their data was backed up despite never syncing their iPhone with their computer or iCloud. Before you snicker, we bet you haven't tapped the full potential of your iOS devices. In this issue of SmallLaw, lawyer and iOS expert Jeff Richardson provides little-known but powerful tips for Apple's Contacts, Reminders, and Notes apps. He also explains how you can use your iPhone to create and manage your usernames and passwords, and enter them into any web browser. Also, don't miss the SmallLaw Pick of the Week (newsletter only) for a buyer's guide to the best iPad keyboards.

IPHONE AND IPAD INFORMATION MANAGEMENT TIPS

Each day of law practice and life inundates us with small bits of information that we need to recall for later reference, but before you can remember one tidbit the next item shows up, followed by another one. Pick up your laundry tomorrow night. Buy travel-sized shaving cream at the pharmacy. Remember this phone number, this password, this person's name, etc. The information never seems to end.

Fortunately, your iPhone is always nearby, and excels at remembering all of the nitty, gritty details so that you don't need to burden yourself with memorization. In this issue of SmallLaw, I'll discuss apps and strategies to help you control this flood of information.

Information About People

You probably use the Contacts app to store a person's name, company name, email address, phone number, and other basic information. But if you tap the Edit button when viewing a contact and then choose Add Field, you will set that you can add many other useful fields.

For example, you can add a Phonetic First or Last Name to remember how to pronounce a person's name and avoid future embarrassment. You can also create a blank notes field with any kind of useful information about a person. I use the notes field to jot down the name and birth dates of children so that when I see someone again, I can remember that his son is "John" and is six years old. You might want to note interests, hobbies, favorite sports teams, etc.

Another field enables you to add a birthday to a contact, after which an entry will appear in Calendar with a small gift icon to remind you. Better yet, the powerful app Fantastical (which I use far more often than the built-in Calendar app) will calculate the math and display that it's Joe's 44th birthday.

The Reminders App and Siri

The iPhone's built-in Reminders app can remind you about specific tasks at a certain time or place. Launch the Reminders app, tap an empty line, jot down a few words about your task (like "Pick up hot dogs for Labor Day barbecue"), and then tap the arrow at the end of the line to remind you at a specific time (Saturday at 5 pm) or at a specific place (such as when you leave your office or when you arrive at a shopping center).

That's a great help, but what makes the Reminders app incredibly useful is the ability to use Siri to create reminders. You can dictate a reminder far faster than you can create one with your fingers. Activate Siri and simply talk to your iPhone. Say "Remind me to call Steve when I get to the office." Siri will ask which Steve, showing you a list of all of your contacts named Steve. Then whenever you next arrive at your office, Siri will remind you to place the call.

You can also tell Siri to "Remind me to go to the bank when I leave home" or "Remind me to start preparing for the Smith meeting at 2:30 on Thursday." All of this works a lot better than jotting down a reminder on cocktail napkin that you forget in your pants pocket, only to be seen again in a different form after going through the washing machine.

You can create different lists in the Reminders app. I recommend that you create one called "Grocery List." That way, in the future, you can simply tell Siri "Add milk to my grocery list." When you get to the store, look at the Grocery List in Reminders to see everything you wanted to remember to buy, including the items you haven't thought about since last Tuesday. You can also create date-specific lists. Tap on a specific date on the calendar in the Reminders app (e.g., Labor Day), and then add your tasks for that day.

All of the above also works on the iPad 3 or later and the iPad mini. In fact, if you have both an iPad and an iPhone, Reminders can keep your two devices in sync via Apple's free iCloud service.

The Notes App and Siri

The built-in Notes app is a simple but effective place to jot down quick notes on any topic that you can imagine. Like Reminders, it's much more powerful when you use Siri. Tell your iPhone or iPad, "Note that Suzie is arriving on Delta flight 456" and Siri will automatically create a new item in the Notes app with that text. Then you no longer need to worry about memorizing that flight number.

Usernames and Passwords

We all struggle to remember the endless usernames and passwords associated with our increasingly digital lives. A horrible "solution" is to use the same password everywhere; you don't want a hacker to gain access to one of your accounts and suddenly have access to all of them.

Rather than place sensitive passwords in the Notes app that any who picks up your iPhone can access, I recommend purchasing one of the many dedicated password apps such as LastPass, mSecure, or my favorite 1Password.

1Password remembers all of my passwords, includes a built-in web browser that can access a web site and enter my username and password automatically, and securely syncs with the web browsers on both my PC and Mac so that with a simple keystroke I can enter (or save) a password for every web site on any computer, iPad, and iPhone of mine. The app can also create complex, secure passwords that are impossible to guess and impervious to so-called dictionary attacks because they don't consist of English words. However, you never have to worry about memorizing or typing these long passwords because 1Password software handles that for you.

1Password can store more than just passwords. It has forms for remembering social security numbers, credit cards, software licenses, etc. I also love the secure notes feature because it provides a place to jot down private information protected under the lock and key of the 1Password app.

Jeff Richardson practices law in New Orleans and publishes iPhone J.D., the oldest and largest website for attorneys who use the iPhone and iPad.

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How to Achieve the Holy Grail With Your Paperless Litigation Practice Part 2 of 2 Plus Motions in Limine

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