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Tabs3's Tech Support; Copying Deposition Testimony Into a Document; Document Naming Tips; Xobni Replacement; Lotus Notes

By Kathryn Hughes | Thursday, February 12, 2015

Today's issue of TL Answers contains these articles:

Donald Coker, Review: Tabs3 and PracticeMaster's Tech Support

Jerry Gonzalez, How to Copy Deposition Testimony Into Word and WordPerfect

Lynn Johnson, Why Law Firms Should Start Document Names With the Date

Don't miss this issue — or any future issues.

How to Receive TL Answers
Do you believe in the wisdom of crowds? In TL Answers, TechnoLawyer members answer legal technology and practice management questions submitted by their peers. This newsletter's popularity stems from the relevance of the questions and answers to virtually everyone in the legal profession. The TL Answers newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Accounting/Billing/Time Capture | Business Productivity/Word Processing | Coming Attractions | Dictation/OCR/Speech Recognition | Document Management | Practice Management/Calendars | TL Answers

MyCase: Read Our Exclusive Report

By Neil J. Squillante | Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Today's issue of TL NewsWire covers a cloud practice management system that can replace OS X and Windows for document management (see article below), a cloud application for reviewing and producing ediscovery, a calendar, contacts, an email app for Android and iOS, and a bookkeeping service with its own project management software. Don't miss the next issue.

PUT DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT WHERE IT BELONGS

A practice management system should include all the information you need to manage your firm — including documents. However, many law firms still store documents in the operating system because their organizational system requires multilevel (nested) folders. This creates information silos. The new version of a leading cloud practice management application seeks to end this bifurcation.

MyCase … in One Sentence

MyCase is a cloud practice management system that this week launched Folders, which provides multilevel folders within matters for document management.

The Killer Feature

MyCase's new Folders feature enables you to mirror whatever organizational structure you've created in OS X or Windows. MyCase offers the advantage of being able to group your folders and subfolders by client and matter. This enables you to access documents as well as all the other information associated with a matter in one place. Security is another benefit as your folders reside within MyCase, which encrypts all your interactions.

Folders behave as you would expect. You can create, name, rename, and delete them, and move multiple documents into, out of, and between them. MyCase also offers tags, which you can use in addition to or instead of folders. Tags enable you to essentially place a document in two locations without having to create a duplicate.

"With Folders, MyCase customers can easily and securely organize their documents through one central system," MyCase Founder and Vice President of Product Matt Spiegel told us. "Folders was the most requested feature by our customers leading up to its release. With Folders, MyCase users can easily and securely organize their documents through one central system."

Other Notable Features

MyCase also organizes contacts, calendars, reminders, tasks, time entries, bills, trust accounts, and more by client and matter. A client portal that can send email and mobile push notifications facilitates secure communication and document sharing with clients. Your clients can also pay their bills via MyCase.

MyCase has several new features other than Folders. Evergreen trust balances technology automatically notifies you when a client's trust balance falls below a threshold you set. Also new, you can include total hours billed on invoices, export batches of invoices as a single PDF file, and calculate dates using the Date Calculator at the bottom of every screen.

What Else Should You Know?

MyCase costs $39 per lawyer per month and $29 per non-lawyer staff per month. This price includes Folders and all the other new features. MyCase works in mobile and desktop web browsers. You can also use MyCase via the free apps for Android and iOS (both iPad and iPhone). Learn more about MyCase.

How to Receive TL NewsWire
So many products, so little time. In each issue of TL NewsWire, you'll learn about five new products for the legal profession. Pressed for time? The newsletter's innovative articles enable lawyers and law office administrators to quickly understand the function of a product, and zero in on its most important features. The TL NewsWire newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Document Management | Practice Management/Calendars | TL NewsWire

Seven Myths About Flat Fees Plus 43 More Must-Reads

By Kathryn Hughes | Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Coming today to SmallLaw: Our editorial team has selected and linked to 44 articles from the past week worthy of your attention. Below you'll find a sample article from each section of today's issue, including our SmallLaw Pick of the Week.

Recommended Agencies for Virtual Assistants

Practicing Law in an Ocean Paradise

The Best Attorney Photos of 2015

Marketing Your Firm With Email Newsletters

Congratulations to Patrick Lamb of In Search of Perfect Client Service on winning our SmallLaw Pick of the Week award: Seven Myths About Flat Fees

How to Receive SmallLaw
Small law firm, big dreams. Written by successful small-firm founders, managing partners, administrators, and legal technology and practice management experts, SmallLaw provides practical advice on management, marketing, and technology issues in solo practices and small law firms. Additionally, SmallLaw features comprehensive reviews of legal products with accompanying TechnoScore ratings. SmallLaw also ensures that you won't miss anything published elsewhere by linking to helpful articles, podcasts, and videos about solo practices and small law firms. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Accounting/Billing/Time Capture | Law Office Management | SmallLaw

A Lawyer Reviews Outlook for iOS Plus 52 More Must-Reads

By Kathryn Hughes | Monday, February 9, 2015

Coming today to BlawgWorld: Our editorial team has selected and linked to 53 articles from the past week worthy of your attention. Below you'll find a sample article from each section of today's issue, including our BlawgWorld Pick of the Week.

The Best Paper Shredders

Why the iPad Became My Main Computer

Another Review of Microsoft Outlook for iOS

How Lawyers Use Dropbox

Congratulations to Jeff Richardson of iPhone J.D. on winning our BlawgWorld Pick of the Week award: A Lawyer Reviews the New Outlook App for iOS

How to Receive BlawgWorld
Our newsletters provide the most comprehensive coverage of both legal technology and mainstream technology of interest to the legal profession (e.g., monitors, smartphones, scanners, the iPad, and more). But not the only coverage. BlawgWorld enables you to stay on top of all the noteworthy legal and mainstream technology articles (and podcasts and videos) published elsewhere without having to hire a research assistant. Even when you're busy, you won't want to miss each issue's Pick of the Week. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Backup/Media/Storage | BlawgWorld Newsletter | Coming Attractions | Copiers/Scanners/Printers | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets | Online/Cloud | Technology Industry/Legal Profession

Worldox Web 2.0: Read Our Exclusive Report

By Neil J. Squillante | Monday, February 9, 2015

Today's issue of TL NewsWire covers an add-on for a popular document management system that facilitates access from any web browser (see article below), a task management add-on for Outlook, PDF creation and conversion software, a note-taking app for the iPad and Mac that integrates with OneNote, and a cloud practice management system for law firms in the United Kingdom. Don't miss the next issue.

DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT ON THE GO

Advances in technology have freed software and thus lawyers from being chained to a single PC. Instead, modern software works on any device. Just login and resume your work. Your document management system in particular should function in this manner so that you need not worry about your ability to access and work on a document.

Worldox Web 2.0 … in One Sentence

Announced last week, World Software's Worldox Web 2.0 enables you to access your firm's Worldox document management system from any desktop or mobile web browser or the Worldox iOS app.

The Killer Feature

The new version of Worldox Web works with Worldox GX4 (also announced yesterday). It enables you to take advantage of Worldox GX4's new "Active Profiling" technology that simplifies saving and profiling of your documents.

Active Profiling creates a real-time profile of every Worldox user at your firm. Accordingly, when you log into your account using Worldox Web via a desktop or mobile web browser or Worldox iOS app, you'll find a navigation panel that provides quick access to the documents you most recently used. Specifically, this panel lists your Bookmarks, Favorite Matters, Favorite Files, and Workspaces.

With Workspaces, you can view Projects — groups of files from anywhere in Worldox, including across different clients and matters. For example, if you're working on two agreements during a particular week, you can add the files for both to a Project after which you can access them from the WorkSpaces Worldox Web navigation panel.

"We are pleased to announce the latest version or our mobile platform, World Software President Ray Zwiefelhofer told us. "Attorneys are more mobile than ever and expect efficient access to their content, wherever they may be. Many of our customers prefer their documents to remain on premise on a local server. Our new version of Worldox Web allows customers to enjoy speedy onsite document access while enjoying seamless access to their content while traveling or working remote."

Other Notable Features

If you need to dig deeper than the navigation panel, Worldox Web provides a search box on your dashboard. The Advanced Search page is one click away if you want to run a more specific query. Worldox Web also supports direct access to cabinets and documents — namely, drilling down your firm's folder structure manually to find a specific document.

Other tools include document sharing via email, document preview, download/upload, check in/check out and document statistics. The latter enables you to review metadata, read comments from colleagues, and access any version of a document.

What Else Should You Know?

Worldox Web sports a redesigned user interface that improves the user experience and facilitates faster access to key functions. Pricing for Worldox Web starts as low as $25 per month. Learn more about Worldox Web 2.0.

How to Receive TL NewsWire
So many products, so little time. In each issue of TL NewsWire, you'll learn about five new products for the legal profession. Pressed for time? The newsletter's innovative articles enable lawyers and law office administrators to quickly understand the function of a product, and zero in on its most important features. The TL NewsWire newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Document Management | Online/Cloud | TL NewsWire

Review of ShareX; Nonbreaking Spaces and Hyphens; Straight Talk Wireless; Basic Gmail Versus Google Work Gmail

By Kathryn Hughes | Friday, February 6, 2015

Today's issue of TL Serendipity contains these articles:

Tom Trottier, Review ShareX (Screenshots)

Deborah Savadra, How to Quickly Insert Nonbreaking Spaces and Hyphens

Don Grassmann, Tip: Straight Talk Wireless and Toyota Entune

Anthony White, Basic Gmail Versus Google Work Gmail

Don't miss this issue — or any future issues.

How to Receive TL Serendipity
Our most serendipitous offering (hence its name), TL Serendipity consists of contributions by TechnoLawyer members who have important information to share. You'll no doubt enjoy it because of its mix of interesting topics and genuinely useful knowledge, including brutally honest product reviews and informative how-tos. The TL Serendipity newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Business Productivity/Word Processing | Coming Attractions | Email/Messaging/Telephony | Graphic Design/Photography/Video | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets | TL Serendipity

How to Meet Anyone Using the "Buzz Networking Method"

By Buzz Bruggeman | Friday, February 6, 2015

Originally published on February 5 in our free SmallLaw newsletter. Instead of reading SmallLaw here after the fact, sign up now to receive future issues in realtime.

Former lawyer and ActiveWords co-founder Buzz Bruggeman seems to knows everyone, including famous authors and billionaire entrepreneurs. We asked Buzz to share his secrets, which we've dubbed the "Buzz Networking Method." As it turns out, Buzz initially created the Buzz Networking Method to build his law practice. You'll learn how it started, why it works, and how to implement it at your law firm. Also, don't miss the SmallLaw Pick of the Week (newsletter only) to learn about the five key factors google uses to rank law firm websites.

In my last weeks at Duke Law School, one of my favorite professors invited me to stop by his office for coffee. In the course of our conversation, he asked me if I had any complaints or suggestions about my three years. I said that the experience had been outstanding, but I wasn't sure I knew how to find the courthouse.

He replied, "If you want to find the courthouse, buy a map." A few months later, I was the newest associate in a law firm, and while I had found the courthouse, I truly had no idea what I was doing.

A few weeks after starting, the firm's office manager walked in, and placed a circular rolodex on my desk. I took one look at it and thought that I was about to be assigned the mind numbing task of cataloging everything in the firm's law library.

But her instructions were very simple. "Write down something (beyond the basics) about every person you meet."

From Chore to Habit

It's now more than 40 years later, and I have slightly more than 14,000 contacts in Microsoft Outlook. When I discussed this story at a CLE event, a young lawyer asked me how I got them into Outlook to which I replied, "One at a time." The more important question is why I have chosen to do this.

At first it truly was a matter of following orders. At some relatively early date, I realized this contemporaneous collection of information about people was a good and potentially even brillant idea. It felt like accumulating this kind of personal information could at some point be very valuable.

There were no software tools when I started. Writing and updating Rolodex cards was a nightmare. My handwriting was terrible. Typing on an IBM Selectric typewriter made the Rolodex cards more readable, but the process was painstakingly slow.

With the advent of personal computers, I began to experiment with what were initially called "PIMs" or personal information managers. These were nothing more than simple databases with templated interfaces that began to simplify the "who/what/when/where/why/how" of what so much of my practice was about.

PIMs made it easier to accumulate data about my clients and others. When a client would mention to me that that his son was at the University of Florida, I would add that piece of data to his "profile." Once this data was in place, the rest became even easier.

I did my best to meet the significant political and business leaders in my community, and sought to ask them questions about themselves such as how they attained their positions in life. I would note their answers, and then follow up later with information that might benefit them. I practiced the doctrine of Woody Allen who said, "80% of success is showing up," and took it many steps further by coming prepared, engaged, and willing to follow through and follow up.

Adding Value to People's Lives One Note at a Time

Along the way, I realized all kinds of activities could help me build my practice — join clubs, play golf, buy drinks, network, etc. But I quickly learned that the two most beneficial activities consisted of referring business to clients and sharing ideas.

Many lawyers refer business, but sharing ideas proved harder because it required greater insight into those I met in terms of what they were passionate about and how I might be able to add value. This required listening carefully to them about non-business matters — the details of their lives and families — and then just taking notes, and processing those notes in a timely fashion.

In the early days, I clipped articles, attached a handwritten note, and had my secretary stuff them into envelopes. I was and remain a voracious reader so finding information was easy. Associating them was a bit harder.

I resolved early on that I should never expect to get a response from my notes. Perhaps my personal psychology was that if my clients thought it was a stupid idea, no problem. But I was predisposed to believe that sharing ideas would be meaningful to someone.

To my surprise and delight, my clients loved my notes. And they began telling their friends about what I did, and how meaningful it was. Adding value to their lives, to their ideas, to their work became a significant part of my everyday work.

A growing body of software for creating this kind of knowledgebase kept reaffirming and reassuring me that my ideas worked.

The Tipping Point

There's one event that truly stands out.

In 1995, I had the good fortune to take my wife and daughters to Moscow for a month. Each day in Russia, I would write 500 to 1,000 words about what I had seen that day. I would email that mini-essay back to my secretary. She would then personalize that message, and send it to every client via email and fax (not everyone had email then). When I returned to the states and my practice, I was a "rock star."

Those email newsletters had spread virally through the community. Hundreds and perhaps thousands of people beyond my client base had read them. There were stacks of phone messages on my desk with the names of people who wanted me to call them about matters that I might handle.

A Lifelong Practice

Even though I no longer practice law, I still practice these same ideas. I constantly find myself sharing information, introducing and connecting people, and doing my very best to add value to their lives.

Today's tools make it easier to store all this information, but the requisite attention to detail remains a human task — talking to people, understanding systems, and remembering or double checking my contact notes to make sure what I plan to share is germane.

At one point, I surmised that "A" list bloggers might be extremely valuable so I begin sharing articles, ideas, links, etc., again without expectation of a response. At one high-tech conference I was recognized by Doc Searls, the co-author of The Cluetrain Manifesto, as being a "C+ blogger, but an A+ blog reader."

As a child I had hoped one day to meet a person who had written a book. Today I am the subject of chapters in two important books. Talk about gratifying! See Robert Scoble, Naked Conversations: How Blogs are Changing the Way Businesses Talk with Customers (2008); Dan Gillmor, We the Media: Grassroots Journalism By the People, For the People (2006).

In the early days of ActiveWords, I received some invaluable advice from someone I respect that again validated the correctness of what I had been doing. He told me, "Once a product is built, it's all about relationships."

As a lawyer, I was the product — the product of my education and experience. But without the relationships I built using the method described in this article I truly wasn't much of anything at all.

Buzz Bruggeman is a co-founder of ActiveWords. He graduated with honors from Coe College and from Duke University Law School. Prior to ActiveWords he spent 30 years as real estate lawyer. He runs all of the outward facing aspects of ActiveWords, including marketing and partnering. Buzz served on the advisory board of the Demo Conference, won a Demo God award, and has been featured in books by Dan Gillmor and Robert Scoble. Buzz has been a longtime participant in the startup and blogging communities, and routinely speaks and consults on using new media tools to market and evangelize software.

How to Receive SmallLaw
Small firm, big dreams. Written by practicing lawyers who manage successful small firms and legal technology and practice management experts who have achieved rock star status, SmallLaw provides practical advice on management, marketing, and technology issues in small law firms, as well as comprehensive legal product reviews with accompanying TechnoScore ratings. SmallLaw also ensures that you won't miss anything published elsewhere by linking to helpful articles (and podcasts and videos) about solo practices and small law firms. The SmallLaw newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Law Firm Marketing/Publications/Web Sites | SmallLaw

Why You Need Only One Domain Name Plus 44 More Must-Reads

By Kathryn Hughes | Tuesday, February 3, 2015

Coming today to SmallLaw: Our editorial team has selected and linked to 45 articles from the past week worthy of your attention. Below you'll find a sample article from each section of today's issue, including our SmallLaw Pick of the Week.

Horenstein Law Group Succeeds by Being Nimble

Keeping Better Notes for Defensive Lawyering

12 Inbound Link Strategies for Lawyers

The 30 Best Law Firm Tag Lines Ever

Congratulations to Kenji Crosland of Mockingbird Marketing on winning our SmallLaw Pick of the Week award: Why Your Law Firm Needs Only One Domain Name

How to Receive SmallLaw
Small law firm, big dreams. Written by successful small-firm founders, managing partners, administrators, and legal technology and practice management experts, SmallLaw provides practical advice on management, marketing, and technology issues in solo practices and small law firms. Additionally, SmallLaw features comprehensive reviews of legal products with accompanying TechnoScore ratings. SmallLaw also ensures that you won't miss anything published elsewhere by linking to helpful articles, podcasts, and videos about solo practices and small law firms. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Coming Attractions | Law Firm Marketing/Publications/Web Sites | Law Office Management | SmallLaw

PDF Documents in Tabs on Your iPad Plus 56 More Must-Reads

By Kathryn Hughes | Monday, February 2, 2015

Coming today to BlawgWorld: Our editorial team has selected and linked to 57 articles from the past week worthy of your attention. Below you'll find a sample article from each section of today's issue, including our BlawgWorld Pick of the Week.

The Tools That Five Virtual Lawyers Use

The Best Portable Document Scanner

Why Monica Bay Is the Big Story This Week

The Fifth Anniversary of the iPad (Podcast)

Congratulations to Jeff Richardson of iPhone J.D. on winning our BlawgWorld Pick of the Week award: PDF Documents in Tabs on Your iPad: It's Christmas Again!

How to Receive BlawgWorld
Our newsletters provide the most comprehensive coverage of both legal technology and mainstream technology of interest to the legal profession (e.g., monitors, smartphones, scanners, the iPad, and more). But not the only coverage. BlawgWorld enables you to stay on top of all the noteworthy legal and mainstream technology articles (and podcasts and videos) published elsewhere without having to hire a research assistant. Even when you're busy, you won't want to miss each issue's Pick of the Week. Please subscribe now.

Topics: BlawgWorld Newsletter | Business Productivity/Word Processing | Coming Attractions | Copiers/Scanners/Printers | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets | Transactional Practice Areas

Why Windows Is No Match for ActiveWords; Tools; Review of WUNoAutoReboot; Why Lit Software Is a Force for Good

By Kathryn Hughes | Friday, January 30, 2015

Today's issue of TL Serendipity contains these articles:

Dave Culbertson, Why Windows Is No Match for ActiveWords

Steve Buchwalter, Review: WUNoAutoReboot

Mark Unger, Why Lit Software Is a Force for Good

Don't miss this issue — or any future issues.

How to Receive TL Serendipity
Our most serendipitous offering (hence its name), TL Serendipity consists of contributions by TechnoLawyer members who have important information to share. You'll no doubt enjoy it because of its mix of interesting topics and genuinely useful knowledge, including brutally honest product reviews and informative how-tos. The TL Serendipity newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Automation/Document Assembly/Macros | Coming Attractions | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets | Litigation/Discovery/Trials | Networking/Operating Systems | TL Serendipity | Utilities
 
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