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Hendrickson Law Firm Leans in With an Assist From Software Plus 10 Questions for a Web Designer

By Kathryn Hughes | Friday, October 17, 2014

Coming today to SmallLaw: Three women team up and find success. It sounds like a music act, but in this case it's a litigation boutique with offices in three cities that handles complex cases. In this issue of SmallLaw, lawyer and journalist Marin Feldman profiles Nancy Hendrickson, Julie Thrall Burrow, and Carolyn Guy, partners of Hendrickson Law Firm. You'll learn about the happy accident that gave birth to the firm as well as the software that enables the trio to offer its clients much lower rates than the large firms against which it competes. Also, don't miss the SmallLaw Pick of the Week for 10 questions to ask before hiring a law firm website designer.

How to Receive SmallLaw
Small firm, big dreams. Written by practicing lawyers who manage successful small firms and legal technology and practice management experts who have achieved rock star status, SmallLaw provides practical advice on management, marketing, and technology issues in small law firms, as well as comprehensive legal product reviews with accompanying TechnoScore ratings. SmallLaw also ensures that you won't miss anything published elsewhere by linking to helpful articles (and podcasts and videos) about solo practices and small law firms. The SmallLaw newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Accounting/Billing/Time Capture | Coming Attractions | Document Management | Graphic Design/Photography/Video | Law Firm Marketing/Publications/Web Sites | Law Office Management | Litigation/Discovery/Trials | SmallLaw

Three iPhone Cases That Add Missing Features Plus 90 More Must-Reads

By Kathryn Hughes | Thursday, May 1, 2014

Coming today to BlawgWorld: Our editorial team has selected and linked to 91 articles from the past week worthy of your attention. Below you'll find a sample article from each section of today's issue, including our BlawgWorld Pick of the Week.

Cloud DMS Inside Microsoft Office

The Best iPhone Timekeeping Apps

How to Use Do Not Disturb on Your iPhone

Don't Give Up on the iPad

Congratulations to David Pogue of Yahoo! Tech on winning our BlawgWorld Pick of the Week award: Three iPhone Cases That Add Missing Features

How to Receive BlawgWorld
Our newsletters provide the most comprehensive coverage of both legal technology and mainstream technology of interest to the legal profession (e.g., monitors, smartphones, scanners, the iPad, and more). But not the only coverage. BlawgWorld enables you to stay on top of all the noteworthy legal and mainstream technology articles (and podcasts and videos) published elsewhere without having to hire a research assistant. Even when you're busy, you won't want to miss each issue's Pick of the Week. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Accounting/Billing/Time Capture | BlawgWorld Newsletter | Business Productivity/Word Processing | Graphic Design/Photography/Video | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets | Online/Cloud | Technology Industry/Legal Profession

How to Use an iPad for Taking Depositions Plus 115 More Must-Reads

By Kathryn Hughes | Monday, March 3, 2014

Coming today to LitigationWorld: Our editorial team has selected and linked to 116 articles from the past two weeks worthy of your attention. Below you'll find a sample article from each section of today's issue, including our LitigationWorld Pick of the Week.

Expert Witness Caveats From the Woody Allen Case

Review: PacerPro

A Google Apps Pleading Template

What Is the Form of Production for a Database?

Congratulations to Christopher B. Hopkins of Palm Beach Bar Bulletin on winning our LitigationWorld Pick of the Week award: How to Use an iPad for Taking Depositions

How to Receive LitigationWorld
All practice areas evolve, but none faster than litigation. Written by successful litigators and other litigation experts, LitigationWorld provides you with practical tips related to electronic discovery, depositions, litigation strategy, litigation technology, and trial presentations. You'll also receive in-depth litigation product reviews as well as links to the most noteworthy articles in other online litigation publications so that you'll never miss anything. The LitigationWorld newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Coming Attractions | Gadgets/Shredders/Office Gear | Graphic Design/Photography/Video | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets | Litigation/Discovery/Trials | LitigationWorld

Reviews of Jaybird Freedom, QuickJump; Remote Depositions; Desktop as a Service

By Kathryn Hughes | Friday, July 12, 2013

Today's issue of Fat Friday contains these articles:

Fred Kruck, Review: Jaybird Freedom Bluetooth Stereo Headphones

Paul Lepine, Review: QuickJump (Outlook Add-On)

Tonya Kaiser, More Advice for Remote Depositions

Joseph Travaglini, Desktop as a Service: A Viable Cloud Alternative

Don't miss this issue — or any future issues.

How to Receive Fat Friday
Our most serendipitous offering, Fat Friday consists of unsolicited contributions by TechnoLawyer members. You'll no doubt enjoy it because of its mix of interesting topics and genuinely useful knowledge, including brutally honest product reviews and informative how-tos. The Fat Friday newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Accounting/Billing/Time Capture | Coming Attractions | Document Management | Fat Friday | Gadgets/Shredders/Office Gear | Graphic Design/Photography/Video | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets | Litigation/Discovery/Trials | Online/Cloud

Using Video Depositions at Trial Plus 106 More Must-Reads

By Kathryn Hughes | Monday, April 1, 2013

Coming today to LitigationWorld: Our editorial team has selected and linked to 107 articles from the past two weeks worthy of your attention. Below you'll find a sample article from each section of today's issue, including our LitigationWorld Pick of the Week.

How to Build a Mobile Law Library With GoodReader (Video)

Getting a Brain Injury Animation Admitted the Hard Way

Shock and Awe Ediscovery: Combatting Asymmetrical Costs

Trending Toward Service of Process via Facebook

Congratulations to Ted Brooks of The Court Technology and Trial Presentation Blawg on winning our LitigationWorld Pick of the Week award: Tips for Using Video Depositions at Trial

How to Receive LitigationWorld
All practice areas evolve, but none faster than litigation. Written by successful litigators and other litigation experts, LitigationWorld provides you with practical tips related to electronic discovery, depositions, litigation strategy, litigation technology, and trial presentations. You'll also receive in-depth litigation product reviews as well as links to the most noteworthy articles in other online litigation publications so that you'll never miss anything. The LitigationWorld newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Document Management | Graphic Design/Photography/Video | Litigation/Discovery/Trials | LitigationWorld | Online/Cloud | Presentations/Projectors

DepositionPro 1.0: Read Our Exclusive Report

By Neil J. Squillante | Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Today's issue of TL NewsWire covers transcript management and review software that can also edit synchronized deposition video (see article below), an iPad app that blurs the line between calculator and spreadsheet, a cloud-based file server, and fonts designed for web sites. Don't miss the next issue.

REAP FROM YOUR DEPOSITIONS WHAT YOU PUT INTO TAKING THEM

There's no better way to impeach a witness than to show a clip from a video deposition of the witness saying something completely at odds with their testimony at trial. For this reason, video depositions have grown in popularity. Showing a transcript lacks the dramatic impact of video. However, working with video has traditionally required the services of a professional editor. A new product aims to make it easy and inexpensive for lawyers and paralegals to edit video depositions.

DepositionPro 1.0 … in One Sentence

Launched this week, ExhibitView Solutions' DepositionPro 1.0 enables you to manage, review, tag, and export key testimony from transcripts, including accompanying video clips if applicable.

The Killer Feature

DepositionPro works with traditional text-only transcripts as well as video depositions. It supports all popular transcript formats. The company can suggest court reporters in your area, and can synchronize your depositions at "half the average cost."

Regarding video depositions, after importing the video and synchronized transcript into DepositionPro, you select relevant testimony in the transcript with your mouse and then press a shortcut key of your choice to save the clip, including the corresponding video. You can rearrange clips in any order, and export them individually or combine them into a single video. You can also print a report containing the portions of the transcript you selected.

You can export video in AVI, MOV, or MP4 formats, all of which play on PCs, Macs, iPads, and Android devices. This means you can use the video in any trial presentation application such as the company's own ExhibitView PC and ExhibitVie iPad, as well as in traditional presentation software such as PowerPoint and Keynote.

"After launching our iPad app for trial presentations, lawyers asked us to build a tool to help them edit synchronized video depositions and create clips for use on PCs and tablets for client memoranda, briefs, deposition outlines, witness preparation, settlement presentations, and of course trial presentations," ExhibitView Solutions Partner Bob Finnell told us. "This was the genesis of DepositionPro."

Other Notable Features

DepositionPro works over your network and with cloud storage providers. You can designate a folder on your file server or on a cloud-based service as the default repository.

The Case Manager screen enables you to organize transcripts by case name, matter number, etc. You can search the full text of one or multiple depositions and save your searches. DepositionPro supports partial word searches and other advanced operators.

DepositionPro enables you to bookmark pages within a deposition, and highlight testimony in your choice of colors. The software lists all your bookmarks so you can jump to any of them with one click. When you copy and paste from transcripts into a document, DepositionPro automatically formats it for you.

What Else Should You Know?

DepositionPro runs on Windows XP and later. It costs $229 per seat plus $49 per seat per year thereafter, which provides updates and technical support. Learn more about DepositionPro.

How to Receive TL NewsWire
So many products, so little time. In each issue of TL NewsWire, you'll learn about five new products for the legal profession. Pressed for time? The newsletter's innovative articles enable lawyers and law office administrators to quickly understand the function of a product, and zero in on its most important features. The TL NewsWire newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Coming Attractions | Graphic Design/Photography/Video | Litigation/Discovery/Trials | Presentations/Projectors | TL NewsWire

Good Cause and the Rise of Remote Video Depositions Plus Litigation's 20 Stages

By Kathryn Hughes | Monday, February 18, 2013

Originally published in the February 11, 2013 issue of LitigationWorld: In the early days of videoconferencing, that spot on a person's face might be a mole or just a lousy webcam or Internet connection. Nowadays, you know for sure it's a mole. Given the improvements in Skype and other videoconferencing tools, courts increasingly permit remote video depositions. But if opposing counsel objects, you may need to prove good cause. In this issue of LitigationWorld, ediscovery blogger and lawyer Joshua Gilliland walks you through a recent motion to provide tips on how to show good cause and what you can expect from a court's order if you win. Also, don't miss the LitigationWorld Pick of the Week for the 20 stages of litigation from a court's perspective.

How to Receive LitigationWorld
All practice areas evolve, but none faster than litigation. Written by successful litigators and other litigation experts, LitigationWorld provides you with practical tips related to electronic discovery, depositions, litigation strategy, litigation technology, and trial presentations. LitigationWorld also features in-depth litigation product reviews with accompanying TechnoScore ratings, as well as links to the most noteworthy litigation articles in other publications so that you'll never miss anything. The LitigationWorld newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Coming Attractions | Graphic Design/Photography/Video | Litigation/Discovery/Trials | LitigationWorld

The SmallLaw 2012 Summer Reading List Part 1: Technology and Marketing Books With More Than an Article's Worth of Good Stuff — Plus a Truly Virtual Law Firm

By Neil J. Squillante | Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Originally published in our free SmallLaw newsletter. Instead of reading SmallLaw here after the fact, sign up now to receive future issues in realtime.

Many authors stretch an idea best suited for an article into a book. In putting together our first ever SmallLaw Summer Reading List, we searched for quality books with more than an article's worth of helpful ideas and tips. Also, we asked each author to explain why their book is worth your valuable time. Thus, you'll find our recommended books and links as well as each author's response to our question. To ensure that our SmallLaw Summer Reading List has something for everyone in the solo and small firm world, it spans two issues of SmallLaw. Part 1 today features books on legal technology and law firm marketing. Also, don't miss the SmallLaw Pick of the Week (subscribers only) to read about an in-house lawyer accused of creating and hiring a fake law firm.

THE SMALLLAW 2012 SUMMER READING LIST PART 1: TECHNOLOGY AND MARKETING BOOKS WITH MORE THAN AN ARTICLE'S WORTH OF GOOD STUFF

Have you ever read a book and thought that the author could have made his points in an article? Books don't cost much money in the grand scheme of things. But they sure cost time. Publishing an article isn't considered as prestigious as publishing a book. Thus, many authors stretch an idea best suited for an article into a book.

To combat this problem and compile our first ever summer reading list for you and other SmallLaw subscribers, we conducted research to find books with more than an article's worth of material. We also tried to find relatively concise books so that you could read more than one. And we asked each author to answer this question:

"The obstacle books face is not their cost but the investment of time they require. What will those who work in small law firms learn from your book that they cannot learn from an article or some other shorter resource?"

Thus, our SmallLaw 2012 Summer Reading List contains not only quality books, but each author's answer to our question.

If you read any of these books, please reply to this issue of SmallLaw to post a review, which we'll publish in Fat Friday.

Tom Mighell, iPad Apps in One Hour for Lawyers (2012)

The great thing about a "One Hour" book is that the investment of time to read it is not great. You can get up to speed on a topic over your lunch break.

While many articles out there discuss the best iPad apps, you're unlikely to find as much helpful information in one place about iPad apps specifically vetted for lawyers. The book presents a curated collection of apps lawyers are most likely to find useful in the areas of productivity, document creation and editing, and news and research — plus utilities for your iPad, and travel resources.

With more than 200,000 apps currently available for the iPad, it's hard for busy lawyers to cut through all the noise and focus on the apps that matter — but with iPad in One Hour for Lawyers, the work is already done for you.

iPad/iPhone Version ($17.99)

Print Version ($34.95; $19.95 for ABA LPM Members)

David Sparks, Paperless (2012)

Paperless offers a holistic approach to transitioning your law practice to a paperless workflow, explaning the nuances of capturing paper (and digital) records, and processing, naming, and storing the files. The book also explains the best strategies for backing up and accessing your digital documents using an iPad.

Paperless stretches the definition of the word "book." In addition to over 26,000 words, it features 32 screencasts and four movies. That is over an 90 minutes of video. The book not only tells you about the best paperless workflow but also shows you.

Having written two books for a major publisher in the past, Paperless really is something new entirely. You'll need an iPad to view the book in the preferred iBooks Author format. You can also purchase it as a PDF file with the videos in a separate folder.

iPad Version ($4.99)

PDF Version ($4.99)

Jan Berinstein, Formatting Legal Documents With Microsoft Word 2010: Tips and Tricks for Working With Pleadings, Contracts, Mailings, and Other Complex Documents (2d Edition 2012)

Obviously, any book contains much more information than a single article. But technical books aren't necessarily "linear," so individuals can learn a tremendous amount without having to read the entire book from cover to cover.

My Word 2010 book, for example, consists of dozens of tutorials that can stand on their own. Readers can jump directly to a specific lesson to master one feature of the program that they find challenging. The modular nature of the lessons is especially useful for members of a firm who are at different skill levels or who need to learn disparate aspects of Word. For example, a secretary might want to brush up on creating and generating a Table of Contents and a Table of Authorities, whereas an attorney may want to look up how to format indented quotes or how to ensure that the text aligns with pleading line numbers.

Another benefit of the book is that it includes a number of "sidebars" that provide helpful how-to and troubleshooting tips. Incidentally, all of the tutorials and tips in the book derive from my real-world experience as a legal word processor.

Print Version ($41.95)

Ben M. Schorr, the Lawyer's Guide to Microsoft Outlook 2010 (2012)

The reality is that there are a lot of resources out there for Microsoft Outlook, including my monthly column here in SmallLaw. Microsoft itself provides hundreds of thousands of pages of content, including videos, about Outlook. I maintain a site myself that has a lot of articles on Outlook. Google lists more than 22 million pages for Microsoft Outlook.

The Lawyer's Guide to Microsoft Outlook 2010 saves you time and effort by collecting nearly all of the Outlook information an attorney needs in one place, and in a format written specifically for attorneys. You can spend hours searching for your answer and wondering which source to trust, or you can save a lot of time and effort by just flipping through one book written just for you.

iPad/iPhone Version ($32.99)

Print Version ($69.95; $41.95 for ABA LPM Members)

Gerry Oginski, Secrets of Lawyer Video Marketing in the Age of YouTube (2012)

The answer is simple. You'll learn tips, strategies, and tactics that will take your video marketing far and beyond the videos of 99% of other lawyers.

The book contains key strategies that you can apply not only to your video marketing, but also to every aspect of your online and offline marketing. In essence, you can multi-purpose these powerful techniques.

For example, learn how to convert a viewer into a caller. Find out why quality counts and why your viewer's thoughts are much more important than yours.

Being a great attorney means knowing not just what to do, but importantly, what not to do. This book helps you understand exactly what you should never do when creating online videos to market your law firm. Video is the key to connecting with prospective clients. Learn why and how to use those opportunities to your advantage.

Kindle Version ($12.56)

Print Version ($13.22)

Read Part 2

Read The SmallLaw 2012 Summer Reading List Part 2 now.

How to Receive SmallLaw
Small firm, big dreams. Written by practicing lawyers who manage successful small firms and legal technology and practice management experts who have achieved rock star status, this newsletter provides practical advice on management, marketing, and technology issues in small law firms, as well as comprehensive legal product reviews with accompanying TechnoScore ratings. The SmallLaw newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: Business Productivity/Word Processing | CLE/News/References | Copiers/Scanners/Printers | Document Management | Email/Messaging/Telephony | Graphic Design/Photography/Video | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets | SmallLaw

BigLaw: Does the Design of Your Law Blog Matter?

By Adrian Dayton | Thursday, December 22, 2011

Originally published on October 4, 2011 in our free BigLaw newsletter. Instead of reading BigLaw here after the fact, sign up now to receive future issues in realtime.

Remember the popular advertisements for beer in which two groups argued between the relative importance of "great taste" versus "less filling"? A similar debate is brewing regarding the creation of blogs for large law firms. What is more important — great content or great design? Most law firms have lawyers capable writing great content, but few have designers in-house that can build and design good-looking blogs. Can you ignore design? Or should your blog(s) have both?

The Case for Great Content

Great content alone can make a blog successful. If you write blog posts helpful to your industry, people will read them, email them, tweet them, etc. — and the media will take notice too. Eventually, they'll end up on sites that corporate counsel use such as JD Supra, Lexology, and Legal OnRamp.

Perhaps most importantly, Google loves great content. The better your content is, the more links it will accumulate. Google's search algorithm uses more than 200 "signals" to rank web pages, but inbound links remain among the most important (the famous PageRank patent). One caveat — Google does not "value" links on social networks as highly as those on web sites so try to encourage others to link to you from their sites (easier said than done).

The Case for Great Design

People who read your blog via email or an RSS reader like Google Reader could care less about your blog's design. But many people will read your blog in a web browser, including everyone who first discovers it with a Google search. So let's explore the design issue.

You don't need to be a designer to recognize a good design. Even if only for a second, we're all conscious of the design when visiting a blog for the first time. Sometimes, the design is so good we notice for more than a second because it blows us away. And sometimes the opposite happens — we can't believe how bad it looks. This first impression is important.

A key element of blog design is user interface, which is often overlooked. A while back I was on a law blog trying to find the author. It took me several clicks before I could find his contact information. What's the point of creating a blog and gaining exposure if prospective clients can't contact you?

The layout and design of your blog is not just important but critically so. Make sure it's easy for people find your contact information. Make sure your blog gives people a positive impression (no pop-ups is a good policy with which to start).

Can You Have Both?

"Why can't you have both"? A designer at a recent conference I spoke at asked me that question. Yes, of course you can have both. As a large firm, you have an advantage. Hiring a top-notch designer won't have a material impact on your expenses unlike at a smaller firm with a much smaller marketing budget.

That said, a blog with great content that uses a prefab template will outperform a beautiful blog with a custom design that lacks great content — as long as the template makes it easy to contact the author(s).

So feel free to spend $10,000 on the design of your blog, but make sure you can create quality content on a regular basis before making that leap. After all, the leading cause of law blog failure is the failure to publish at all.

Conclusion

Blogs don't cost much money to start. Many inexpensive and free options exist. Far more important is the quality of the content and the frequency with which you add content. Publishing is a grind. Law firms are not media companies by nature so many just wing it without editorial calendars and other publishing workflow tools that they may not even realize exist.

I recommend that even large firms start conservatively. Have a basic blog built for you by a local web designer for no more than $1,500. Try blogging for six months. If you like it and think you can keep it up, make a more substantial investment.

The blogosphere is littered with failed blogs that never made it past their first couple of blog posts. Having a blog experiment fail quietly is no big deal, but having a blog fail after spending a lot of money is fodder for Above the Law and others in the large firm gossip business. If you start creating great content, people will ignore the design as long as it's not terrible. After all, you're a law firm, not a fashion magazine.

Written by Adrian Dayton of Marketing Strategy and the Law.

How to Receive BigLaw
Many large firms have good reputations for their work and bad reputations as places to work. Why? Answering this question requires digging up some dirt, but we do with the best of intentions. Published first via email newsletter and later here on our blog, BigLaw analyzes the business practices, marketing strategies, and technologies used by the country's biggest law firms in an effort to unearth best and worst practices. The BigLaw newsletter is free so don't miss the next issue. Please subscribe now.

Topics: BigLaw | Graphic Design/Photography/Video | Law Firm Marketing/Publications/Web Sites

The Latest Salvo in the Legal Research War Plus 131 More Must-Reads

By Kathryn Hughes | Monday, December 12, 2011

Coming today to BlawgWorld: Our editorial team has selected and linked to 132 articles from the past week worthy of your attention, including our Post of the Week. Here's a sample:

Lexis Advance: What Lexis Got Right

Will Tablets Replace Laptops?

An American Lawyer Goes Virtual From Canada

Making Your Blog Content More Shareworthy

Don't miss this issue or future issues.

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Our newsletters provide the most comprehensive coverage of legal technology, practice management, and law firm marketing, but not the only coverage. To stay on top of all the noteworthy articles published in blogs and other online publications you could either hire a research assistant or simply subscribe to BlawgWorld. The BlawgWorld newsletter has received rave reviews and is free. Please subscribe now.

Topics: BlawgWorld Newsletter | Coming Attractions | Graphic Design/Photography/Video | Laptops/Smartphones/Tablets | Law Firm Marketing/Publications/Web Sites | Law Office Management | Legal Research
 
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